Praise Jesus, They’re Going to Vote on Health Care Tomorrow!

House to vote Thursday on Obamacare repeal bill

Why Democrats secretly want an Obamacare repeal vote: House Democrats think they could seize the majority in 2018 if Republicans are on the record backing the controversial health bill.

House Democrats think they’ve finally found their path back to power: Republicans voting to repeal Obamacare.

Yes, the best thing to happen to House Democrats since they pushed through the sprawling health care law — and lost the majority as a result — could be the Republican drive to dismantle it.

“I think the Republicans are playing Russian roulette with this vote,” said Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.). “There’s no question in competitive districts where you’ve got a potentially vulnerable Republican incumbent, this could make or break you.”

Democrats don’t actually want the law repealed. Under their dream scenario, House GOP leaders would muscle through their controversial health care bill only to watch it die a long, painful death in the Senate, where it has already received a lukewarm reception from Republicans. Obamacare would stay intact while the House Republicans who voted to gut the law have a big shiny target on their back heading into the 2018 midterms.

And how does this all feel to a Republican?

GOP lawmaker says Republicans are treating the health-care bill like a ‘kidney stone’ they just want to ‘pass’

Oh, So That’s the Reason

fantasy football

Reporters asked why, after Republicans held dozens of nearly-unanimous votes to repeal Obamacare under President Obama, they were getting cold feet now that they control the levers of power. [Representative Joe Barton, Republican of Texas, responded,] “Sometimes you’re playing Fantasy Football and sometimes you’re in the real game,” he said. “We knew the president, if we could get a repeal bill to his desk, would almost certainly veto it. This time we knew if it got to the president’s desk it would be signed.”

The Long Night of the Republicans’ “Souls”

dark night

It is almost midnight on Thursday, March 23, also known as the “long night of the [Republicans’] souls.”

Aardvark’s crystal ball is cloudy. We all wait in suspense for the vote on Friday. Poisonally, I don’t think it’s going to happen, any more than it happened tonight. But we shall see.

Meanwhile, 26 percent of the electorate have no idea in hell about what’s going on. Dog bites man.

But for the more sentient among us, the story is told by this evening’s press release from the Quinnipiac University Poll, which reads in part,

American voters disapprove 56 – 17 percent, with 26 percent undecided, of the Republican health care plan to replace Obamacare, the Affordable Care Act, according to a Quinnipiac University national poll released today. Support among Republicans is a lackluster 41 – 24 percent.

If their U.S. Senator or member of Congress votes to replace Obamacare with the Republican health care plan, 46 percent of voters say they will be less likely to vote for that person, while 19 percent say they will be more likely and 29 percent say this vote won’t matter, the independent Quinnipiac (KWIN-uh-pe-ack) University Poll finds.

Disapproval of the Republican plan is 56 – 22 percent among men, 56 – 13 percent among women, 54 – 20 percent among white voters, 64 – 10 percent among non-white voters, 80 – 3 percent among Democrats, 58 – 14 percent among independent voters and by margins of 2-1 or more in every age group.

One out of every seven Americans, 14 percent, think they will lose their health insurance under the Republican plan. That 14 percent includes 27 percent of voters in families with household income below $30,000, 18 percent of working class families and 14 percent of middle class families.

Fewer Americans would be covered under the GOP plan than are covered under Obamacare, 61 percent of voters find, while 8 percent say more would be covered and 18 percent say the number would be about the same.

So much winning!

Surprisingly Good News

GOP Rep. Mo Brooks says town hall protests may prevent Obamacare repeal

(CNN)Republican Rep. Mo Brooks said Thursday that protests at town halls around the country might prevent Republican lawmakers from repealing the Affordable Care Act.

“I’ll tell you, Toni, there are a, in my opinion, a significant number of congressmen who are being impacted by these kinds of protests and their spine is a little bit weak,” the Alabama congressman said in an interview on “The Morning Show with Toni & Gary” on WBHP 800 Alabama radio. “And I don’t know if we’re going to be able to repeal Obamacare now because these folks who support Obamacare are very active, they’re putting pressure on congressman and there’s not a counter-effort to steel the spine of some of these congressmen in tossup districts around the country.”

Brooks continued, “And you may not even see a vote to repeal Obamacare, you might see something where they call it a repeal but really it’s an amendment. You and I have talked about this before. We need an outright repeal of Obamacare and then whatever’s gonna come after it, fine, let’s have that discussion. But this monstrosity needs to be repealed and right now, in my judgment, we don’t have the votes in Congress to pass a repeal bill, in part because of what these people are doing.” …

“Quite frankly, I don’t know that this administration supports a full repeal,” he said. “To the contrary, the president has expressed support for some of the provisions that are in Obamacare. And if that’s the case, if that ends up being the administration’s position, then that is not a repeal of Obamacare, that’s an amendment to Obamacare.”

When the host referred to a popular Obamacare provision allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ insurance until age 26, Brooks said that wasn’t the only element of the law that Trump supported.

“It’s bigger than that, Toni,” he said. “Remember when Donald Trump publicly stated during the campaign that he’s going to make sure everybody has health insurance? OK? That’s Obamacare.”