Do You Believe in Magic?

In his op-ed, Joe Biden got one thing wrong. (And I certainly hope the glitch was intentional—that it didn’t reflect a failure of perception on Joe’s part.)

Biden implied that Trump is putting political gain over the lives of Americans.

That is not a valid way of looking at the situation. The rational way for Trump to advance his own political interests—even now; yes, even now—would be to lead a national effort to implement testing and contact tracing.

Trump does indeed think he is promoting his political interests. But he is delusional.

Today, we are heading to a massive confrontation between the Senate testimony by Dr. Fauci and the massive display of delusion at yesterday’s news conference.

The irresistible force is about to collide with the immovable object.

You are advised to stand well away from the fan.

Reforming Health Care through Magical Thinking, or, Governance as the Art of Pulling Stuff out of your Ass

ass

Unlike some people he could name, Aardvark understands the difference between a hunch and a proven fact. Aardvark does not claim his hunches are proven facts. What follows is a hunch.

Trump claims that he has an Obamacare replacement bill all ready to go, but for a few minor tweaks and maybe a final run through spellcheck; that this bill will provide insurance for all; that the copays will be much lower than those available under Obamacare; and that the quality of health care will be much better than what is currently on offer.

I don’t think there is a bill. I think he just pulled it out of his ass.

And why might he do such a thing? Five reasons:

  1. He wants to stop Congress from destroying American health care.
  2. He wants to cater to the chronic magical thinking of his base.
  3. He wants to stop Bernie Sanders from stealing his crowds.
  4. His life experience has taught that promises are made to be broken, and
  5. He has a weak grasp on the difference between reality and fantasy.