Grieve and Resist

This morning I join Charles Blow in his eloquently expressed grief for our country—or what we had thought was our country. (He could have said—though he didn’t say, in so many words—that half of America’s white people are not a credit to their race.)

He is attempting to weaken our institutions, our protocols and conventions, our faith in the truth, our sense of honor and our respect for the rule of law.

And somehow, many Americans, even those disgusted by what they see, have resigned themselves to this new reality.

In fact, Trump’s poll numbers had been inching up before he created a humanitarian disaster at the border by separating children from their parents.

I guess this is how empires begin to fall. It isn’t necessarily one dramatic moment, but the incessant monotony of assaults on normalcy that slowly shift the ground beneath you, reorienting what is proper and preferable, what is outrageous and what is acceptable. …

Not to mention the fact that those tactics keep his base riled and ready. Trump is like a drug dealer who has addicted his followers to fear and rage and keeps supplying it in constant doses. His supporters have become rage-junkies for whom he can do no wrong.

Let’s be clear about the demographics of this base: While the overwhelming majority of blacks and Hispanics have an unfavorable view of Trump, just as many white people have a favorable view of him as have an unfavorable view of him, according to a Suffolk University/USA Today poll conducted last month.

Blow despairs of our situation, and I understand his despair.

But progressives are a mighty army of resistance, and E.J. Dione reminds us that all is far from lost. And we have a new ally of convenience: big business, motivated by crass and cynical economic considerations, is finding that Trump’s delusional blundering on trade is about to bring the house crashing down.

Welcome to the newest member of the resistance, the United States Chamber of Commerce.